Jump to content
Touring Motor Gliders Association (TMGA)

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Earlier
  2. Eric Greenwell

    Dynon CHT needle flutters

    In my case, it's the CHT (not the EGT) that's wavering, but your comments give me couple ideas: I'll check the wire connection to the sensor clip more carefully, and I'll exchange the right and left CHT sensors to see if the problem moves. Right now, we have 8" of snow on the ground, blowing snow in the air, and a ceiling of 1400', so it'll likely be week before I can test it ☹️
  3. edwalker

    Dynon CHT needle flutters

    Hi Eric, I’m not sure if this is related or not, but I had problems with the same connection. My EGT was wavering in flight and when I checked it the left front sensor wire was almost imperceptibly loose. The clamp was tightly adherent to the exhaust pipe but the wire could be moved, and I could feel the sensor shake ever so slightly inside the ceramic insulator. This happened right before one of my annuals, and Jim Scott put some RTG on the connection to stabilize the wire within the ceramic insulator. no problems since. I’m not sure that this applies to your situation, but it may be worth taking the sensor off the exhaust pipe and looking at the integrity of the probe from the other side to check for motion. It will also let you check the sensor ground. Might be good to put a VOM across the sensor and wiggle the wire to see if there is any variable resistance and compare it with the other sensor. It may be that this part of the engine is subject to stresses that are different than the opposite EGT probe, and there may need to be some additional wire tie support for the lead going to the probe. Ed
  4. Eric Greenwell

    Dynon CHT needle flutters

    During my 2/6/2019 flight, I noticed the left CHT needle on the Dynon was fluttering between 130-145, while the right CHT needle was steady. That was with the cowl flap fully open; with the cowl flap fully closed, both needles were steady. I've never seen the fluttering before. On the ground, I did not see any problem or change in the sensor or the connector to it and or it's wire. Wiggling the wire next to the connector did not cause the needle to wiggle. Note that the Left CHT is on the upper left, front corner of the engine; the Right CHT is on the upper right, rear corner. The left air inlet on the cowl blows air almost directly in the upper left, front CHT (the right/rear sensor shielded from the right cowl inlet), so it's hard for me to imagine how the airflow from the cowl scoop could affect it. Any ideas?
  5. I have a small crack in the usual spot on the crank case behind cylinder #3 of my Limbach LB2000EB. If anyone knows where I could get a used or new case, or used engine please alert me. Thanks so much! - Michael Price
  6. MFPrice

    Limbach L2000 crank case or engine?

    I have a small crack in the usual spot on the crank case behind cylinder #3 of my Limbach LB2000. If anyone knows where I could get a used or new case, or used engine please alert me. Thanks so much! - Michael Price
  7. MFPrice

    Limbach L2000EB crank case or engine?

    I have a small crack in the usual spot on the crank case behind cylinder #3 of my Limbach LB2000EB. If anyone knows where I could get a used or new case, or used engine please alert me. Thanks so much! - Michael Price
  8. Same request to: rae.bud.williams@gmail.com
  9. MFPrice

    Anyone have a G109A crank case?

    Just emailed and texted him, thanks so much John (really appreciated).
  10. jmfuller

    Anyone have a G109A crank case?

    Have you tried Ron at Harmony Garage in Cotati, CA? They rebuilt our engine several years ago (s/n 1118) and, if I remember correctly, may have some parts. Been doing these for a long time: Ron Mattson (harmonygarage@aol.com) (707) 795-3889 Good luck, John
  11. jimA

    Location of Pitch Servo

    Thanks Jim, Once I get a look at it I'll email or give you a call. It exhibits all the symptoms of the shear screw and I know there's two versions of the screw out there. The newer one is intended to fix a premature failure.
  12. Jim Lee

    Location of Pitch Servo

    Hi Jim, Eric is right. The pitch servo is under the baggage floor. The roll servo is under the right seat pan. You should email me. If indeed the servo shear screw has failed, this is the first case in a Phoenix, and there is a good chance that something else is amiss. Cheers, Jim
  13. Eric Greenwell

    Location of Pitch Servo

    My pictures show the pitch servo under the baggage floor, essentially centered.
  14. It's been a while since I've been under the baggage floor and I don't remember if the AP Pitch servo is located there. Hate to take all that apart to find out it's somewhere else. The sheer screw has failed and I'll be replacing it this week. It's a U15. Thanks
  15. MFPrice

    Anyone have a G109A crank case?

    I've noticed a recent small crack in my left crank case and thought it would be a good idea to replace rather than repair it for safety and longevity. Might anyone have that part or know where I could find one new or used? Thank you. (if you need the particulars my current G109A engine is an L2000EB1.AA S/N: 1184) Sincerely, Michael Price 801 Kellerman Kreek Marietta GA 30068 USA +1-404-395-3218
  16. cees willemse

    LX Nav Vario

    Dear Enthousiasts, I am considering the purchase of a Pipistrel sinus nose-wheel or tailwheel or a Phoenix U 15 only in tailwheel, is there anyone who could help me with the right/important considerations , i will fly mainly on grassfields. ThaNK YOU cees willemse
  17. sheridan9sc

    Ballistic Parachute Repacking

    Mike, The invoice breaks down the shipping as: Shipping of Canopy to Stratos for Inspection and Repack $146.90 Return Shipping Charges, from Factory to Customer $261.15 I don't know if the number of parachutes at one time would affect that cost.
  18. mikeschumann

    Ballistic Parachute Repacking

    Why was the shipping $400? I thought going thru the US dealer was going to get the shipping costs down. USPS shipping one way to the Czech Republic is ~$100.
  19. sheridan9sc

    Ballistic Parachute Repacking

    Here is the follow-up to my previous post. Parachute was returned to me on December 17, so about six weeks from shipment. Cost was $395 for the repack and $400 for the shipping to and from Czechoslovakia and back to me. Total cost, $860. I never got Dennis' photo listed in the instructions, but essentially you are only sending the softpack with the parachute itself. While Dennis needs the pictures of the cable in your plane in full resolution, I will attach reduced resolution shots here. All pictures in series 1 are taken inside the plane from various uncomfortable positions. Picture 1a is taken in selfie mode because it is behind the black, carbon fiber box you see in the top left of 1b (you will need an extra light source to illuminate the connection with the rocket). Picture 1d is under the instrument panel. Picture 4 is view from the top of the airplane looking down into the end of the rocket. Don't know if he needed all of the pictures in series 1, but these views were sufficient for him. All in all, the most difficult part is getting the parachute in and out of the plane!
  20. Good reminder - it's been at least three years since I've changed the tape on mine. Next time I'm at the hangar, I'll warm up a tape end on the wing root, then lift enough off the surface to see how much residue is left. I've always (30+ years) used 3M General Purpose Adhesive Cleaner #08984 to remove tape residue (and more, not just on gliders).
  21. In cool conditions (anything other than Florida or Arizona in the summer), use a heat gun first, and bring the temperature of the wing to about 80 f degrees. Then peel the tape sideways at a 45 degree angle. From Cumulus Soaring: Important Safety Note: "Gap Seal Tape" is Not Designed for Use on Control Surfaces This stretchy plastic tape is perfect for use sealing fixed gaps - such as the gap between the wing and fuselage. I do not recommend using it on control surfaces such as the gap between the wing and aileron or the fin and rudder, or the horizontal stabilizer and elevator. Plastic tape will shrink over time and especially when it gets hot in the sun. If it is connected to a control surface it may contract over time and not allow full travel of the control surface. Or as it gets tight it may pull off as it is stretched by the control surface - which could lead to high drag or reduced control of the aircraft as the tape flaps in the airstream or changes the airflow over the control surface. Using plastic tape secured on both sides and across a control surface gap is unsafe and may be an illegal modification to the aircraft. Notes on Cleaning Tape Residue
  22. Since it's in a hangar, I've had the same wing root tape on the Phoenix since its last annual a year ago. It's some of the high quality tape offered on Wings and Wheels. I had to remove it today to track down a leak, and to my surprise it was almost impossible to get off. Apparently the adhesive had dried out and formed a more steadfast bond with the gelcoat. I had to gently use a small plastic scraper to slowly get the vinyl tape off and then use some GooGone to soak and remove the yellowed, hardened adhesive. After wiping with a dry cloth I removed the final residue with some acetone. It took about an hour just to do one root. My guess about how this happened is that the tape adhesive gradually dries out over time. It probably didn't help that I had the plane in hot conditions in Ephrata last summer where it sat out with its covers in 90+ degree heat for several days. The W&W tape has a good reputation, but most sailplane owners are using it for shorter periods of time since it is removed at disassembly. I'm going to change it out more often. Additionally, in case this happens to anyone else... What got me started on this was that I found a small puddle (maybe 2 teaspoons) of oil under the bottom of the plane this morning. The drip point was the centerline of the fuselage about 9 inches in front of the trailing edge of the wing. There is nothing there that should be dripping except it is the low point of the belly at rest. What was weird was that there was a faint residue of oil from that drip point back to the trailing edge of the left wing root tape on the underside of the wing. Several very smart people spent an hour looking at this and trying to figure out what was happening until we realized the mechanism. I'm sure you're all familiar with the oil system breather tube that vents to a small slot just in the fuselage centerline just ahead of the landing gear. I've been practicing a lot of no spoiler landings in the pattern, and there is a very slight residue from the breather hole to the midpoint of the wing root underside. Some oil from the breather tube got under the wing root tape edge in the angled flow of the slips and then gradually tunneled back in the tape to the trailing edge where it slowly dripped out after I left, working its way by gravity to the fuselage centerline where it accumulated until a drop could form and create the tiny puddle. Very subtle. What was puzzling was, although we all thought it was oil, there was no direct residue path from the breather slot down the centerline to the drip point. Apparently the slips created the ideal conditions for this anomalous pathway. The tape from the underside midpoint of the wing all the way back was still adherent, but when I pulled on it the tape came off easily and was clearly soaked with oil.
  23. Jim Lee

    Oil Temp

    Hey Discus 239, that you Bill? What you describe is common. What Mike said about the cowl flap position is correct. What happens is the cowl flap cable slips in the clamp. It is attached to the radiator cowl with a clamp. When the cable housing slips in the clamp, the cowl flap setting changes. Yours now allows the cowl flap to go beyond open to a partly closed position. If you take a careful look at the cowl flap in full open position (I know that you already did, but imagine the tail sitting 2 feet high in the flight position) and imagine the air flowing straight into the inlet, you will notice that the partly closed cowl flap will now disrupt the airflow, decreasing cooling. Pull the cowl flap out one notch and see if the angle looks better. It doesn't take much of an angle to make a big difference in oil temp during the climb. Two easy fixes. Number one, pull the cowl flap knob out one notch and look at the cowl flap position. If it s now in the full open position, then this is your new open position of the knob. Number two, measure how much cable movement it takes to put the cowl flap in the open position. Remove the lower cowling, and move the cable housing this amount in the clamp. Your open setting will now be correct.
  24. MFPrice

    LX Nav Vario

    I use an S80 in my G109, programmed the variables a couple of years ago by looking at the Polar in the manual and figuring out the mathmatical translation but you solved it by just asking LXNav which works even better (no math required). Sorry I did not see your post last year. Overall I am satisfied with the S80 except that I bought the optional Artificial Horizon feature that they were unable to get working because of the engine vibrations which interfered with their hardware/software combination and Paul Remde at Cumulus refused to credit me even after LXNav admitted they were unable to make it work. Paul wanted me to uninstall the instrument, ship it at my expense to him for deprogramming, ship it at my expense back to me, then incur the cost of installation again which together would have cost more than what I paid for the instrument (another example of what Opioids are doing to America, definitely cannot recommend him).
  25. Eric Greenwell

    Oil Temp

    I hope I remember to try partially closing the flap the next time I make a long climb. Could be 4 months before the weather is hot enough to be a problem, and I might forget by then 😉
  1. Load more activity
×