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Touring Motor Gliders Association (TMGA)

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  3. Thermalseeker

    TMGA active?

    I fly a 2003 Super Ximango out of my home strip (TN89) in SE Tennessee. The Sequatchie Valley has long been a soaring mecca in the southeast USA for hang gliding and sailplanes, and now paragliders. With over 190 miles of soarable ridge, along with abundant thermals, regular convergence over the plateau and fairly reliable wave from 3 different wind directions, it's easy to get 150-200 hours/year here. A typical flight for me is 15 minutes warm up and climb to usable lift, then 3-5 hours of engine-off soaring, followed by an engine on landing. The Ximango has adequate enough performance that engine idling while soaring is not necessary. I've done 16, 500k's in my Ximango so far, all but one here in the Sequatchie. The other was done out of Minden, NV. Here's a fine day with my X in Parowan, UT: https://www.motorgliders.org/gallery/image/273-500-below-cloudbase-at-parowan/
  4. Jim Lee

    Oil Temp

    We have one Phoenix in the US which has an oil thermostat. There is an LOA available to anyone who wants to install a thermostat. It is generally not necessary, in that the cowl flap does a very good job of regulating the coolant and oil temperatures. The oil thermostat closes to stop the flow of cold oil from the radiator, and then opens again to regulate the oil temperature. Consequently, the oil temperature fluctuates until the operating oil temp matches the oil radiator (behind the coolant radiator) temperature. It is better to just wait until the oil temperature comes up to operating temp in both the engine and the radiator. Usually a taxi to the end of the runway with the cowl flap closed is sufficient even in the coldest ambient temperatures that anyone would want to go flying in. The cowl flap has no influence on the cabin heat, which comes from a shroud around the muffler. Exhaust gas temperature to the muffler is what dictates cabin heat which does not change with cowl flap setting. But a lower operating rpm which Andreas mentions does slightly lower EGT and so would reflect lower cabin heat available. Try to regulate the oil temperature with the cowl flap so that it is around 190 degrees F. That is the sweet spot. If you have a restart after soaring and your oil temperature is low and you are low and about to crash, by all means, use full power to get out of the situation rather than damaging my plane on loan to you. Don't worry about damage to the engine, it will probably be fine, and the main thing is not to damage my (your) Phoenix.
  5. Terry Moyes

    Ximango seat harnesses

    hello i would like to replace both sets of straps as they are becoming worn. what do you recommend? also does anyone have details of what i need to spec for the aircaft attachment points with the straps supplier? many thanks terry
  6. Lambada flaperon ship mfg in 2007, SN 92-13. Category S-LSA; it can be used for commercial purposes including instruction. Only Flaperon S-SLSA in fleet. Hours: TTE 934 hours Airframe 1135 hours. A five-year Rotax maintenance was performed April 2016. Fresh Annual October 2018, New Wood Comp propeller September 2018. In Feb/March 2014 the plane was completely disassembled, and the gel coat was sanded off and the plane was painted 2 color polyurethane paint (white and a metallic blue trim lines) which is in like new condition. The control panel has a Borgelt variometer and slave display on passenger side; air speed indicator, precision small altimeter, liquid compass, Garmin GTX 327 Mode C Transponder, Garmin Radio SL 40 and PS 1200 intercom. MGL Avionics iEFIS 7” Discovery lite. The ship has two main batteries with a selector switch and recharge cables installed for external charger. Having two main batteries enables you to have confidence you will get an engine restart if you have been on one battery for an extended period of time in soaring (engine off) flight. Two Mountain High units for Oxygen Pilot/Passenger and O2 bottle. Two Bose noise cancelling headsets Tow hook for towing sailplanes 15M and 13 meter tips 2 strobe lights (beneath cockpit and top of horizontal stab), led navigation/strobe lights (wingtips), and led landing light. Galaxy Ballistic Recovery system – due for repack Canopy and propeller covers The custom shade/hangar which is portable and can be removed from KSEZ and erected at another airport. (no discount if you do not want it – just saves me cost of removal) Storage bins Mode C transponder tested November 2016 All new fuel, oil, coolant lines, new sensors, April 2016. New landing gear 9/2015. Brand new custom seat covers in cockpit. All logbooks, invoices and history. This ship was built before Urban Air subcontracted out the tail assemblies which was followed by two breakups in high speed flight (aircraft occupants all saved by ballastic chute). Contact Russ Hustead: 602.622.2257 – russ@skykingsoaring.com
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  8. philphil_99

    philphil_99

  9. philphil_99

    Need Grob 109 Check-out Flight

    I do... philphil_99yahoo.com We can use mone or yours. thx, Phil
  10. Eric Greenwell

    TMGA active?

    Lovely pictures, Blake. I envy your Boulder area for the waves it produces. My area (KRLD) in southeastern Washington produces weaker waves and less frequently. The better waves are about 90-100nm upwind, and the weather in between usually makes the round trip a bit iffy, so I haven't used them much. I have not had any problems with plug fouling or carb ice, even with 3 hour+ flights. I did suspect carb icing in a Ximango during a humid wave flight about 30 years ago, but I don't know if it's engine installation makes that more likely than on the Phoenix.
  11. Blake Poe

    TMGA active?

    Jamey, Thanks for the encouragement with writing. I do enjoy it but don't always make the time. I have not had problems with carb ice or plugs fouling on the 912A with fairly long periods (1-2hrs) of idle. Inevitably when flying wave I find the sink. To minimize the altitude loss and marginally suppress the pucker factor of plummet mode I'll add some throttle. It probably helps more from a perception standpoint than actually reducing sink rate though (climb rate of normally aspirated 912 at 17+k is nill). Blake
  12. Jamey Jacobs

    TMGA active?

    Blake - thanks for your comments and pics. The write-up in your soaringlabs blog is truly wonderful! I’m curious about extended idle flying. Do you occasionally increase the throttle to clear the plugs and avoid carb ice, or is that not an issue in your experience? I look forward to learning from, and flying with you sometime in the future. Please keep writing up your experiences!
  13. DragoB

    Grob109b documentation in English

    Hellu! I am in the process of obtaining relevant data for a couple of developers bringing our beloved grob109b to the world of x-plane. Now, I do have the documentation, but it is written in german and thus pretty much unusable; hence my request for the english version. If anyone can be so kind to provide me with this, I would ever be so grateful! Warmest regards, Drago
  14. Blake Poe

    TMGA active?

    I have a Diamond Super Dimona (published 28:1) and like Eric have done the majority of my soaring with the engine at idle. This is mostly due to the fact that last summer I was flying around SoCal over highly populated areas and not always within glide of an uncontrolled airport. I recently moved to Boulder CO (now based out of Longmont) and expect to have more engine off time on strong summer days. Most of my wave flying time has also been with the engine on. I've done this mostly because I've used wave on xc flights and wanted the extra safety, warmth, and full battery. Last year I flew it from Minden to John Wayne non-stop mostly in wave. Here's a more detailed write-up of that flight https://soaringlabs.com/2018/04/24/surfing-the-sierra-wave-april-15th-2018/. On my ferry flight from Warner Springs to Boulder I flew up the lee of the Front Range from Taos to Pikes Peak in wave (pictures below). I'm quite excited to fly in wave that forms regularly right over Boulder and Longmont in the coming weeks and months!
  15. discus239

    Oil Temp

    Yes, Hi Jim, as always you are precisely correct, adjustment accomplished. Bill
  16. AIRUSA has spare parts and other supplies for the Lambada and the SunDancer Light Sport aircraft. I have a stock of supplies that were accumulated during the early period of AIRUSA’s dealership for Distar’s products. As you may know, Distar, the manufacturer of the Lambada, SunDancer and Samba, took over the company known as Urban Air. Distar moved forward with more testing of the Lambada and later renamed the Lambada as the SunDancer. There were several major advances made to the SunDancer. One was to separate the flap operations from the spoiler operations. The SunDancer now has two levers instead of one for both operations. The next greatest improvement was to establish the SunDancer Vne as 119Kts. The original Lambada Special Light Sport aircraft imported to the United States suffered from a couple of mishaps. One occurred in the Czech Republic and one happened in West Texas, USA. These mishaps, of course, created a bad image of the Lambada Special Light Sport aircraft. After continued research and testing of the Lambada, and the suggestions made to Distar from AIRUSA, the Lambada became the SunDancer. The SunDancer is a new and improved product, with a 119 knot Vne and separated spoiler and flaperons. It certainly is an aircraft of distinction and erases the unfortunate reputation of the Light Sport Lambada. So why not change the name to SunDancer so you don’t have to talk about the Lambada as an S-LSA? I need to make clear some other details about the Lambada and SunDancer. The original Lambada was imported to the United States as an experimental aircraft as early as 2004. The original Lambada Vne was 108 Knots. It was equipped with spoilers and flaperons but those controls were on one lever. In order to get spoiler operations, it was necessary to go full flaps first. The pilots who own them like them. Note: none of these aircraft were certified as Light Sport. The Light Sport Lambada was made for the new Light Sport category established by the FAA in 2005. The Vne was established to be 119 Knots. The Light Sport version did not have flaps at all, only spoilers, along with short ailerons, not flaperons. After the two mishaps, the Vne was reduced to 81 knots with promises of returning the Vne back to 119 knots when the problems were corrected. That, of course, never happened. What did happen was that Distar redesigned the Lambada, performed further testing of the aircraft, and gained approval to re-establish the Vne to 119 knots for the newly manufactured aircraft. Separating the flaperon operation from the spoiler operation was an excellent improvement. So why shouldn’t it be named something else like SunDancer? Note:The factory issued bulletin, announcing the reduction of the Vne of the Lambada to 81 knots, only affected the Vne of the Light Sport Lambada not the Experimental Lambada. Joe Kulbeth - AIRUSA Aeronautical & Industrial Resources, USA 6872 West Harvard Ave, Fresno CA 93723 559-960-7873 Email: joekulbeth.airusa@gmail.com
  17. airusa

    Update from AirUSA

    AIRUSA has spare parts and other supplies for the Lambada and the SunDancer Light Sport aircraft. I have a stock of supplies that were accumulated during the early period of AIRUSA’s dealership for Distar’s products. As you may know, Distar, the manufacturer of the Lambada, SunDancer and Samba, took over the company known as Urban Air. Distar moved forward with more testing of the Lambada and later renamed the Lambada as the SunDancer. There were several major advances made to the SunDancer. One was to separate the flap operations from the spoiler operations. The SunDancer now has two levers instead of one for both operations. The next greatest improvement was to establish the SunDancer Vne as 119Kts. The original Lambada Special Light Sport aircraft imported to the United States suffered from a couple of mishaps. One occurred in the Czech Republic and one happened in West Texas, USA. These mishaps, of course, created a bad image of the Lambada Special Light Sport aircraft. After continued research and testing of the Lambada, and the suggestions made to Distar from AIRUSA, the Lambada became the SunDancer. The SunDancer is a new and improved product, with a 119 knot Vne and separated spoiler and flaperons. It certainly is an aircraft of distinction and erases the unfortunate reputation of the Light Sport Lambada. So why not change the name to SunDancer so you don’t have to talk about the Lambada as an S-LSA? I need to make clear some other details about the Lambada and SunDancer. The original Lambada was imported to the United States as an experimental aircraft as early as 2004. The original Lambada Vne was 108 Knots. It was equipped with spoilers and flaperons but those controls were on one lever. In order to get spoiler operations, it was necessary to go full flaps first. The pilots who own them like them. Note: none of these aircraft were certified as Light Sport. The Light Sport Lambada was made for the new Light Sport category established by the FAA in 2005. The Vne was established to be 119 Knots. The Light Sport version did not have flaps at all, only spoilers, along with short ailerons, not flaperons. After the two mishaps, the Vne was reduced to 81 knots with promises of returning the Vne back to 119 knots when the problems were corrected. That, of course, never happened. What did happen was that Distar redesigned the Lambada, performed further testing of the aircraft, and gained approval to re-establish the Vne to 119 knots for the newly manufactured aircraft. Separating the flaperon operation from the spoiler operation was an excellent improvement. So why shouldn’t it be named something else like SunDancer? Note:The factory issued bulletin, announcing the reduction of the Vne of the Lambada to 81 knots, only affected the Vne of the Light Sport Lambada not the Experimental Lambada. Joe Kulbeth - AIRUSA Aeronautical & Industrial Resources, USA 6872 West Harvard Ave, Fresno CA 93723 559-960-7873 Email: joekulbeth.airusa@gmail.com
  18. Eric Greenwell

    Headset compatibility with Phoenix

    My wife and I use a Clarity Aloft headsets. They work well, and there is no chance of it scratching anything. For other passengers, I have standard headset, and none of the passengers' heads seemed close enough to touch the canopy (the passengers were male and female, small and large).
  19. Eric Greenwell

    Oil Temp

    I've never heard anyone mention a thermostat for the oil on a Phoenix. If you have the original cowl flap with flat section on one of the long sides, it can be replaced with flap that doesn't have that section, and consequently, blocks more of the cowl scoop when it's closed. A downside of the change is a greater chance of overheating if you forget the cowl flap is closed (because it is really much more restrictive than the original flap). I got my new cowl flap from the dealer.
  20. Andreas Clauss

    Oil Temp

    Eric, spot on. Are you aware of any U15's in the US with the mentioned thermostat? Thanks, Andreas
  21. mikeschumann

    Headset compatibility with Phoenix

    I bought this sleeve: https://www.lightspeedaviation.com/product/qfr-zippered-head-pad/ I installed it on my headset (not a lightspeed) with the zipper down. It may or may not fit different headsets.
  22. Jamey Jacobs

    Headset compatibility with Phoenix

    Thanks. Did you buy the sleeve? If so, where?
  23. mikeschumann

    Headset compatibility with Phoenix

    Scratching the canopy is definitely an issue. I got a fabric (maybe leather) sleeve that zippers over the headset bracket to minimize this. Are you buying a new Phoneix? If so, make sure you get LEMO jacks installed instead of, or in addition to traditional headset jacks, so you can use a noise cancelling headset without screwing around with batteries.
  24. Quick question to Phoenix owners regarding headsets (I need to replace my old one and anticipate buying a Phoenix). Any experience / issue with the Bose A20 and potential scratching of the canopy? How about Lightspeed Zulu 3? Others you recommend?
  25. mikeschumann

    Electric Fuel Pump

    This afternoon I left the electric fuel pump on after landing and shutdown the engine. Over 30-60 seconds the fuel pressure slowly dropped to 0. Looks like I need to replace the pump. Does anyone know the part number and a source for the pump?
  26. Doug Levy

    Canopy seal

    Hi I'm new to this group and just getting started with motor gliding. I have a Phoenix and I'm in the process of getting my self-launching endorsement. Lots to learn. My question is how to glue the canopy sealing gasket back into place. I've tried a couple of things but have been unsuccessful. Any recommendations?
  27. Ron Friedhoff

    South Central Florida Rendezvous?

    Hi All, I own a Sundancer which presently resides in California. My goal is to enjoy it in South Florida this coming winter. Presently working on the logistics e.g. finding a suitable hanger near my home in Wellington, Fl. ( Any leads appreciated!!!) I do have a 28ft landscape trailer as my backup. Planning on attending the wave camp in Minden in April and possibly bringing my motor glider.
  28. Eric Greenwell

    Electric Fuel Pump

    I check the fuel flow into the filter with the top cowling off, of course, but checking the pressure from the cockpit display like you do sounds like a good additional check. I don't know why I haven't been doing it every flight, instead of sporadically. I don't recall it taking more than 10 seconds to build up pressure, but I will measure it next time I fly.
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