Jump to content
Touring Motor Gliders Association (TMGA)

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/18/2021 in all areas

  1. The elusive G109A maintenance manual was found (special thanks to Gerald Suhrcke in Bayer who had a copy). It is attached here (German only but we are just glad to find it) along with the G109B maintenance manual in English just in case anyone does not have it as well (plus other related docs are in the link below). Thanks Gerald!! https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1sPaPYyR_YJ-EAo3iTY8-Tcr5vz0J9Bux?usp=sharing Grob-G109A-Maintenance-manual-Rev7.pdf Grob-G109B-Maintenance-manual.pdf
    2 points
  2. Thanks for the suggestion. I figured it out and successfully repaired it. The trick is to use a 6mm ball hex socket, a universal, and several extensions to reach thru the inspection opening then the second set of hands undoes the nut which is tucked in the welded box at the bottom. I found the internals so packed with grit that the cam could not push the spring off the stop since it was packed behind the space the spring should move into. The bearing surfaces were pretty well chewed up, A good cleaning and lubrication solved it. Bob
    2 points
  3. Great article! I actually own this very aircraft N300BG and just completed a cross country trip from Pennsylvania to Oklahoma last week. It flew well and particularly enjoyed cruising at 2200 rpm (cruise pitch setting). The trip took around 13 flight hours and I made several stops along the way. The Grob can outlast me anytime when it comes to endurance! Thanks for posting the article.
    2 points
  4. I've done quite a bit of XC in my Ximango (been to the west coast from Tennessee twice, plus other excursions to Florida, NC, SC, OH, and VA). I figure on 4.5 gph. That gives a little fudge factor, but I'm running a little harder at around 5200 rpm in cruise. I see 115 kt pretty regularly up to about 8000'. Above 8000' it definitely slows down. My Ximango is a little different than the others, though. Mine has positive seals on the rudder and elevator, as well as Mylar on the hinge lines, fairings over the wing fold latches, profiled spoiler caps, fitted and sealed gear doors, contoured composite inspection covers replacing the factory flat aluminum plates, and low profile inspection doors on the sump drains. I also tape up the wing fairings. It's noticeably cleaner and quieter than other Ximangos I've flown. I've played a bit with prop pitch, too. There is a sweet spot.
    1 point
  5. Much like you shouldn't go immediately to take off power with a cold engine, you don't want to abruptly shut down a hot engine. Throttle back and let it cool down at idle for 5 minutes. I even do this with the Rotax 912s in my Ximango. New heads are expensive. Flying around with the engine at idle for 5 minutes is not. When you shut down a hot engine at altitude you're blowing cold air on hot cast metal. This is begging for uneven cooling which will eventually lead to cracks, usually in the front cylinder heads because that is where the coolest of the cooling air goes first. So, go to idle for a few minutes, let the engine cool down slowly through airflow and oil temp, then shut down. I let my oil temp drop to 160F before I shut down my Rotax. If you don't have wet heads you might want to let it cool down a bit farther. As my granny used to say "Better to hold the phone than have a kidney stone".........
    1 point
  6. I bought a Grob 109 B from Jim Fangman. I ferry it from Michigan to SC this past weekend. Here are few pictures. Yes, this is mine...good by savings! Stopped in London KY. Beautiful Morning picture Flying over Mt Mictchell In NC 6,684 feet tall, we flew over at 9500. My home lake Murry Lexington SC near Columbia CAE, we were on the look out for the big boys...did not see a single one. Now at its new home in Owens Field KCUB in Columbia SC.
    1 point
  7. An older gel coat finish (S/N before 121 or so) would definitely be heavier, but not 50 lbs heavier. However, little things do add up rapidly. As an old EAA councilor once told me "Son, take care of the ounces and the pounds will take care of themselves". What you probably should do is weigh the airplane and verify the numbers. It's a very simple procedure. Look for it in the manual. That much of a discrepancy would concern me. WRT the designation for a "motorglider", the FAA refers to them as "Powered Gliders" in an Advisory Circular entitled “Powered Glider,” (AC) 21.17-2a. This AC states three requirements to be certificated as a “Powered Glider” under FAA regulations: First, it may be either Single or two place (no two place back seats). Second, the maximum gross weight is limited to 850kg (1874 lbs), and third, the wing loading (weight/span) loading must be no more than .62 lbs/sqft. In addition to AC 21.17-2a, FAR 91.205 lists the requirements for engine monitoring. The requirements laid out in AC 21.17 were adopted by the FAA in 1984, nine years before the EU was even formed. These requirements come directly from the FAA, not the EU. FWIW, many authorizing agencies around the world reciprocate with the FAA regs. In the case of Brazil, ANAC, the Brazilian FAA, adopted our FAR's verbatim with little deviation, with one of those deviations being the gross operating weight of the Ximango (depending on how it is registered). The 2500 lb weight limit comes directly from Claudio Vianna, the owner and Chief Engineer of Aeromot, as well as several of his junior Engineers and the factory test pilot. You will find this designation on the various Type Certificates. The Ximango has been used for a variety of missions, not just as a motorglider. These include coastal patrols, wildlife patrols, police surveillance, primary trainers for the USAFA, and for oil/gas/mineral exploration. The Ximango platform (fuselage and inboard wing sections) were used in the Guri (AMT-600), a primary aerobatic trainer used by the Brazilian Air Force, 28 of which were manufactured. Equipped with an IO-360 and constant speed prop, the Guri is a 180 knot aerobatic airplane. The Guri was also manufactured with an 0-200, fixed pitch prop and fixed gear for a domestic basic trainer. I saw seven of these when I visited Brazil and the Aeromot factory in 2010. Here's a photo of the civilian version of the Guri:
    1 point
  8. Everybody! Thank you with your replies. Here is a summary: Very small group and not an email list. Personally, I think touring motogliders are the way to go for the future of flying as they have the best economy, good over land speeds, and easy to fly compared to Cessna. Now we just need to have affordable motorgliders.
    1 point
  9. Grob has released the drawings to change from a Grob 2500 to a Rotax 912. It is in a service bulletin under the "General" portion of downloads. According to the same service bulletin, the Grob 2500 is now 'obsolete'. Southern Sailplanes recovered from 2500s as part of "Project Able" but now shows all of them as sold out.
    1 point
  10. Glider pilots are most definitely a tiny group compared with ASEL drivers. Some I'm sure fly gliders because they can't get a medical certificate. I first soloed a glider in 1977, but switched to "The Dark Side" in 1978 to earn an ASEL as paying for glider, instructor AND tows cost more than learning to drive a Cessna. The development of modern motor gliders have evened out training costs, but remain pretty much unavailable to rent, so for those who can't afford/don't want to own any kind of aircraft but do want to fly must pretty much choose between joining a glider club or flying a powered airplane. For Steve Burritt, Rand Vollmer, the Pipistrel dealer in Florida (Zephyr Hills) is a CFI-G, and Right Rudder Aviation in Inverness FL offers training to Private Pilot Glider for $2,999. I do not know whether or not they have a motor glider to rent. Be aware there is no "Motor Glider" certificate per se. Your choices include a Glider Certificate at the Recreational, Sport or Private Pilot levels, each with endorsements for the type of launch: Aerotow, Ground Launch or Self Launch. For a motor glider you need a self-launch logbook endorsement. As far as "lack of participation" is concerned, you need to ask specific questions. Steve Sliwa is running this site at his own expense (thank you Steve) and it's not a motor glider Wikipedia which you can browse to find answers to questions you haven't even thought of yet. If you have a question about a specific make and model which is owned by a member of the group, I think most are willing to answer questions. I for example own a Pipistrel Sinus Flex and am reasonably familiar with the Pipistrel models and with carbureted Rotax engines, but I know very little about the other motor gliders out there.
    1 point
  11. I modeled the website after the very active COPA website (Cirrus Owners and Pilot's Association). I think I accomplished 90% of the feature set with a few enhancements. I understand they paid their technology vendor six figures to implement theirs and I am not sure about the maintenance. One issue: We couldn't get any active moderators to help keep conversations moving along. I was busy on the backend and couldn't provide that service. Another issue I noticed is that many of our 'members' were not comfortable with forum technology. They really like email distribution lists rather than a website to which one needs to log in. Many many times I got emails from members replying to the email notifications that there is a post of interest. They forgot they needed to log into the site to manage their information. I added written and video tutorials when launching the website to try and get people over the technology hump. That didn't seem to work. People might prefer Facebook or the equivalent Google group. I don't do Facebook anymore as I can't support their business model (they consistently choose profit over the interests of their subscribers). Just for calibration: We have 1200 people who have registered. I thinned accounts a bit and we are at 1000. I think the number who have ever posted in a forum is something like 180.
    1 point
  12. Hi all I would like to get your help. Currently I got Grob G109B in France and thinking to bring it to Japan. but Grob website does not helped anything. so I would consider to carry with your help. I really appreciate if you help and tell me how you tied up when you carry by car or container, or tell me the g109 strong point for tie up. Thanks! Shu
    1 point
  13. I simplified the website and was able to get the updates done. See the post in the Hangar Flying forum for more details.
    1 point
  14. My trip was around 1100 miles as a made a few detours to stay away from busy airspace. Fuel consumption was 22 mpg and most of the trip was with light headwinds. I flew at 4500 feet about 11 hours or so and 2 hours at 6500 feet. Airspeed was around 90 mph most of the time. The one thing that surprised me was that the Grob could fly a lot longer than I could….my longest leg was 4 hours and there was still plenty of fuel for a few more hours. As for how long in days….I got a late start the first day (3pm) and only flew 2.5 hours. The next day I noticed a front blocking my way so I opted to enjoy a day off to let it pass. I then flew two more days before arriving in Tulsa around 5pm. I could have made better time and save a day by leaving super early each day but I was in no hurry. It was an epic trip and the longest I have ever undertaken in any single engine aircraft. The Grob is a good cross country flyer!
    1 point
  15. Steve, 1) The stock wheel is a bear to work with. In my experience, the key is to first support the wheel via a dummy axle post (secured rigidly in a workshop vise) and work one tire bead onto the wheel; then work the tube into the tire, then mechanically clamp (i.e. squeeze without pinching the tube) one sector of the tire together so that both tire beads can be worked together down into the "valley" at the mid-plane of the wheel, and then work the remainder of the second bead onto the tire. Talcum powder does help. Liquid soap can also be used, but expect a mess. It's hard enough to do in the workshop and quite impractical if you're stranded somewhere. 2) As HiFlite has pointed out, the Tost Moritz II is well worth using. This is a two-piece split wheel that allows easy tire/tube replacement. A spare tire and tube, plus a few basic hand tools, are all that are needed in the aircraft to avoid being stranded. I can confirm HiFlite's information that there is a small difference in the hub width (and thus bearing spacing) of the two wheel types, which necessitates some adjustments to the spacers. Specifically, the Tost wheel is slightly wider than the stock wheel and so, if the stock shoulder spacers are placed into the Tost bearings, the overall spacer-to-spacer distance ends up slightly larger than the gap between the fork legs and it won't fit. There are a couple of ways to deal with this: (a) Place the stock spacers in a lathe and turn off a millimeter or so (sometimes a fraction of a millimeter or so) from the inside shoulder of each spacer. To figure out how much material to remove, place the stock shoulder spacers into the Tost wheel, measure outside-to-outside across the spacers, and compare with a measurement taken inside-to-inside between the fork legs. Take the difference between the two measurements and use half the value for the amount of material to remove from under each shoulder. One consideration (issue) with this method is that the hollow spacer tube (between bearings) of the Tost wheel has a 12mm bore, whereas the hollow spacer tube between the bearings in the stock wheel has a 6mm bore (in order to fit the 6mm axle bolt). Re-using the stock spacer tube (compression tube), by transferring it over to the Tost wheel, won't work because it'll be too short and using the included Tost spacer tube is questionable because there won't be anything to hold it concentric with the 6mm axle (i.e. not a good idea to allow the Tost hollow spacer tube to orbit the axle). A new spacer tube (with length equal to the Tost spacer tube and bore matching the stock tube) can be turned on the lathe. Alternately, a sleeve (with 6mm ID and 12mm OD) could be inserted into the Tost spacer tube. (b) Another option is to order a pair of FTCLA flanged collars from Misumi. This is a "configurable" part and dimensions can be specified as needed to fit the requirements. For example, a configured part number might be FTCLA-V6-D12-H15.5-T13-L30. https://us.misumi-ec.com/vona2/detail/110300235050/ . The V6 corresponds to the axle bolt hole size, the D12 corresponds to the bearing ID, the H15.5 is the shoulder OD, the T13 is the shoulder length (this is the value that needs to be determined according to the fork spacing), and the L30 is the overall length. The length of the shank that goes though the bearing and into the hollow compression tube between bearings is thus 30mm - 13mm = 17mm. Note that the L30 can be any reasonable number, just not too long otherwise the shanks of the two opposing spacers will meet at the middle of the wheel assembly. The main benefit of having the shank length greater than the bearing width (8mm) is that the extended shank will extend past the bearing and hold the 12mm ID Tost spacer tube concentric with the 6mm axle (avoiding the issue noted in the previous paragraph). The shank length can be made any length up to a value that is shy of the two shoulder spacers meeting in the middle of the wheel assembly. Since the shoulder length (T13 in the example) can only be specified in 1mm increments, generally round the required dimension down to the nearest millimeter (or if the required value is really close to the next larger increment, round up and a tiny amount of flex in the fork legs will accommodate it). It is also possible to specify one part with a shoulder length one millimeter more than the other (for example, order one with T13 and the other with T14). Note: the stock spacers are not necessarily identical either. For any fine-tuning of the shoulder-to-shoulder distance, some 0.2mm, 0.3mm, or 0.5mm thick stainless steel ring shims from Misumi can also be considered. For example, PACK10-CIMRS12-16-0.2, PACK10-CIMRS12-16-0.3, or PACK10-CIMRS12-16-0.5. https://us.misumi-ec.com/vona2/detail/110302677870/ . Cheers, Leo Tost Moritz II wheel with shoulder spacers. Side-by-side of Tost two-piece wheel with stock single-piece wheel. Close up of slightly shorter shoulder spacer (placed inverted) next to the installed stock spacer.
    1 point
  16. I have the original instrument panel and the right and left center cover left over. when you in need of engine work / panel work or leather wrapping let me know.
    1 point
  17. Slick Champion customer service: "I have an M2266 approved for the Grob with a VW engine and 4300 series mag. I checked and the firing order is the same as your’s 1324. My lengths are 1-29”; 3-29”, 2-24” and 4-24”; this is the measurement between the outside of the mag cap to the center of the swedged ferrule where the plug nut seats. If this works for you in lengths it will work fine!" So you can use G109A harness to G109B.
    1 point
  18. Bleeding by pushing new oil from the caliper via the reservoir is the only way however even if you have removed all the air your brake could still be mushy misleading you toward presence of air when the problem is a rubber brake line that is too weak. When I bought my Taifun the owner was charge lots of hours by the mechanics that triec to bleed the brake before understanding that the brake line was weak and were bulging. A new set of braded brake line make the brake very effective.
    1 point
  19. Subject: Welcome to the Taifun 17E Motorglider group From: "finbarsheehy" <finbarsheehy@ Date: 9/14/06 8:10 PM To: Taifun17E@yahoogroups.com This purpose of this group is to facilitate discussion about the Taifun. Please post a message with your interests if you read this message.
    1 point
  20. Abstract: I am considering purchase of a Grob 109B that does not have the appliance to fold the wings with one person! I have contacted Grob and with the Euro at its present and increasing value find it quite costly to purchase from them! I would like the specifications, drawings and photos of the aforemention rigging tool so that I might replecate it. Any help would be more than appreciated. Subject: rigging/derig tool for 109B grob From: "p.cullman" <antiqair@LfW8lcx3rZ_6_Hm1t5tgCIEqes1XjsLFh2ul2pkVpscIn03F5wDdOyLw6Of9GEJpnGYDhBFGRg.yahoo.invalid> Date: 3/17/08 8:32 AM To: G109_Pilots@yahoogroups.com I am considering purchase of a Grob 109B that does not have the appliance to fold the wings with one person! I have contacted Grob and with the Euro at its present and increasing value find it quite costly to purchase from them! I would like the specifications, drawings and photos of the aforemention rigging tool so that I might replecate it. Any help would be more than appreciated. Paul Cullman Subject: Re: rigging/derig tool for 109B grob From: "prg55100" <pierrot.greff@uqPcJOcwayM1LSJRQZcLcCFX0qzku_ijl1-k9Ofd1wJZeXLGGHk78g0rwGuSV2mDpz2eAqF8ZXko8LNN3k8QnQ.yahoo.invalid> Date: 4/4/08 2:21 PM To: G109_Pilots@yahoogroups.com Paul, These one man rigs are worth money. I use them at each flight. I have no specs or drawings but can send you some pictures if you send me your Email. Regards Pierrot Subject: Re: [G109_Pilots] Re: rigging/derig tool for 109B grob From: Date: 4/4/08 5:15 PM To: <G109_Pilots@yahoogroups.com> I plan on folding each time also! any help in my manufacturing the rig I would be eternally grateful. Paul Culman / antiqair. Subject: Re: [G109_Pilots] Re: rigging/derig tool for 109B grob From: lyonbyte@5KhwPChWZ54Mm6DoffRr96ZuYUjn5KcDcqmp-aTerhgsakD0Aqn_Ko8oHlIqrUa1KVYoCOdCiSI.yahoo.invalid Date: 4/6/08 12:28 PM To: G109_Pilots@yahoogroups.com I have a 109b in Hawaii, I would love to see the pics if the rigger if you don't mind. I may be losing my hanger soon. Thanks BILL LYON TerraPAC Imagery AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 59-510 Makana Road Haleiwa, Hawaii 96712 808-225-6355 Subject: Re: [G109_Pilots] Re: rigging/derig tool for 109B grob From: pierrot Greff Date: 4/7/08 1:06 PM To: G109_Pilots@yahoogroups.com Hi Paul, Herewith my address Looking foreward some of your pictures. May I put some online on my site at: http://mp.motoplaneur.free.fr/ Thanks alot and fly safely Pierrot Subject: Re: [G109_Pilots] Re: rigging/derig tool for 109B grob From: "Richard Depinay" <jeplane@nnbloh8HZcpgnk3QDYMek6mqigjtlYw6aYeJedNfq6CNgOR7Jdekl1X5pNca1-LCGQ-mMI2fMoTe.yahoo.invalid> Date: 4/8/08 2:16 PM To: G109_Pilots@yahoogroups.com You are bringing a lot of memories Pierrot! I have 300 hrs in the Dimona AK posted on your site, back in 1984, when it was brand new, and still with a F-W... immatriculation. (aero-club de St-Quentin dans l'Aisne) Since then I have immigrated to the US. Richard Phoenix, AZ Subject: rigging/derig tool for 109B grob From: "Paul Cullman" <antiqair@QXSReJ5eNQRianUj1VfLSPVIrkQ_9CcEr44miU2AIx-xFApI3GYPoEESsfKJ5J6B8RFLVeh1DVchCA.yahoo.invalid> Date: 5/17/08 8:34 PM To: G109_Pilots@yahoogroups.com Well many thanks to member Pierrot I was able to have the single person rigging tool replicated and I find that yes I can rig and derig my 109B by myself and move it in and out of the hanger. I do have a motorized tug that was used on a Mooney that I plan to adapt so the movement will be some what easier. My neighbor who is in the business of steel fabrication was able to duplicate, from photos the rather intricate device. Many thanks to our member in France for his great help. I am presently operating of a two thousand foot grass strip that is one way. The Grob loves the grass as long as it is mowed.
    1 point
  21. From the album: Tim Dews

    He got slow on the climb out and spun into the trees. His straps were not done up and when the aircraft hit the branch that you can see in the photo, he left the Grob through the screen. The engine was going at 3300 rpm but the prop had been smashed by the branch. He went through the prop disc and hit the ground before the aircraft. You can see all the dirt on the wing from the spinning stubs of the prop. He was very lucky to get away with a bust leg and a few smashed teeth. Had his straps been done up, I think he would have walked away from it.
    1 point
  22. First of all, apologies about the long paragraph - the website is not responding to line feed requests. I spent some time yesterday at the NW EAA FlyIn at Arlington WA and attended an excellent forum on Rotax engine maintenance by Phil Lockwood of Lockwood Aviation in Sebring Florida. For someone who grew up with Lycomings and Continentals this was a major revelation to see how Rotax has raised the bar on efficiency and reliability. The main message was that these engines were remarkably well built, and that if one follows the recommended maintenance schedule, particularly oil changes, they should last forever. Even the 2000hr TBO engines he's seen rarely need replacement parts. I asked him some specific Phoenix-related questions that have not been entirely clear to me. The first was on engine burping and pulling through the prop prior to start. He said that normally he rarely does this, and it only really needs to be done if the oil is below the land (flat part) of the dipstick on inspection. The purpose of the burping is to pull all the oil back into the sump to get an accurate oil level for purposes of seeing if more needs to be added, and his experience is that it is rare to need do that between oil changes. Also, the prop does not have to be pulled through prior to start. In Lycoming and Continental engines that sometimes is recommended to coat the cylinder walls with a thin film of oil after an extended period of inactivity, but he said that the special coating on the 912 cylinder walls does not require any additional lubrication prior to start. So the rule is, basically, if you see enough oil on the land, go ahead and start without burping. The second issue comes up after soaring. I told him that the engine cools after extended soaring, and that, because I often land under power to be able to taxi, I have a long period of trying to get the oil back up to 120F, which is challenging if you are also descending under low power in cool air. He said that we don't need to worry about that. Unless you plan on doing touch and goes that require full power, he said it was fine to land and taxi with cooler oil temps. His cutoff point for needing 120F is 4000 RPM, so landing and taxi should be fine. He mentioned that he sometimes will take off at 4000 RPM even before the engine is fully warm. His only other major point was to be sure that the carbs are balanced since failure to do so puts asymmetric loads on the gear box and makes gear wear more likely. One other point got my attention. The Rotax water-cooled heads prevent shock cooling that is common on air-cooled engines, so the ultra-long, planned descents under significant power to gradually cool the engine aren't necessary with the 912ULS.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...