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Touring Motor Gliders Association (TMGA)

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  1. Yesterday
  2. Dave

    com radio static

    Hi George, glad you found it. I'm taller than you, and the "air conditioner" blows low enough so that it doesn't generally hit my mic. I only need the a/c when on the ground and generally stuff a microfiber cloth into the thing once I get to altitude where it's cooler. Another simple measure I've taken is to crank up the squelch as needed to defeat the noise on the ground. It's been miserably hot the last few weeks.
  3. Last week
  4. philphil_99

    Ferry Services and Instruction

    Offering flight training in your aircraft or ours along with ferry services for touring motor gliders. References available, reasonable fees and over 10,000 hours in general aviation aircraft. Thx
  5. philphil_99

    Self launch Endorsements

    Come enjoy our wonderful scenery while earning your self-launch endorsement in southern Arizona in a G109B. Feel free to review my website for additional information. www.soaringflight.com
  6. GaryB

    G109B iPad Mount on Panel

    Has anyone fitted an iPad mini mount to a 109B panel, if so I'd appreciate a photo. I like the look of the Guardian Avionics mount but it won't fit in portrait orientation and in landscape, it eats up too much panel space..... https://www.guardianavionics.com/ifdr-aircraft-instrument-panel-flush-mount-ipad-mini Any comments/suggestions welcome. Gary B (UK)
  7. Earlier
  8. Eric Greenwell

    com radio static

    I'm glad you solved your problem, as I never found what was causing my static years ago. It went away after fiddling with some connectors and hasn't come back. Currently I am chasing a whine in my motorhome satellite radio that comes and goes, so I'll reread Ed's advice and see if that will help solve it.
  9. Kmotexas

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  10. Kmotexas

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  11. Kmotexas

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  12. Scott Renne

    2017 Pipistrel Sinus MAX

    2017 Pipistrel Sinus MAX (SN 891 SNM 912 LSA) Rotax 912 80HP, Feathering Prop, Tricycle Gear, Ballastic Parachute, Mountain High Oxygen, Long Range Tanks (800 NM range), EarthX Lithium Battery, Long Wing Tips, Dynon HDX1100, Autopilot, LX Nav Vario w/Total Energy Probe, many options, professionally maintained by US Motorgliders, always hangared, 10 in and out, NDH, 210 TTAF. Located KRNM. Price $139,000. To purchase this aircraft new today would be more than $180,000.
  13. Jim Lee

    com radio static

    As Maxwell Smart would say, "Ah, the old air blowing on the mic trick".
  14. Ted Hauser

    Ted Hauser

  15. Gfeldman

    com radio static

    Hi all, So the com radio static issue is solved thanks to Ed's suggestion to think broadly about the problem. On the morning when the problem first occurred I had placed the right angle vent that Jim Lee made in the passenger side sliding vent of the cockpit. It has been unbearably hot and I thought that extra airflow would help. Dave Glosser has been using this on his Phoenix without incident. Today I flew the Phoenix without the additional vent without changing anything else and all radio static disappeared. I use a noise cancelling One-X David Clark headset and I think there are some air flow conditions that make this particular headset go crazy. What I've learned from this incident is that its a good idea to have a backup handheld transceiver on hand, ideally hooked up to an outside antenna just in case. Thinking back I could have done something really simple in the air when this problem occurred by simply turning off the noise cancelling feature of the headset but my brain was way overloaded at that point. Ed thanks so much for saving me hours of what would have been fruitless trouble shooting. George
  16. Gfeldman

    com radio static

    Ed, thanks a lot. This is very helpful. george
  17. edwalker

    com radio static

    Hi George, Sorry to hear about your difficulty.You may have already thought of some of this, but I thought I’d suggest it anyway. I am a ham radio operator, and I’m frequently tracing down new instances of interference in my radios, and I usually have to do a systematic step-by-step process to figure it out. One thing that you might want to do first before you pull the seats and start looking at wiring is doing a formal history of the event and then a systematic process of elimination system by system to get a better handle on the source of the static. 1. Is there a clue in when it started and how it started? Did it suddenly appear or did it build? What were you doing at the time when you first noticed it? Where were you when you first noticed it? Did you make any configuration changes in the aircraft right before it started? Does anything correlate with the initiation or modification of the static? 2. Think about the nature of the static. Is there something about the type of static that would give you a clue? Is it a constant hash like white noise, is it pulsing, does it have any rythmicity to it? Was it affected by heading or power settings? Did anything modify it such as your position in the seat? Did it appear in both speaker in the headphones? Did it ever go away or change in any manner? Is it uniform across all frequencies? Did you bring anything with you on that flight that was different? For example, plug-in USB chargers and power supplies can create a tremendous amount of radio frequency interference. Did anything in your configuration change? Try to remember everything you can about the moment appeared. 3. If you don’t get any clues from the above history, I suggest that you make a list of all the switches and modes (e.g., autopilot configurations) in which the plane can operate and run through the list first with the engine off and then with it on and then at different rpm settings. If the static comes on, keep going through the list and see if it changes with additional switches. The appearance or absence or modification of the static should narrow down your search of where to focus. I realize that you’ve probably thought of or done most of what I’ve listed here, So I’m just giving you an example of how to start over to elicit some clues that you need so that you don’t end up chasing random wires. My experience in chasing down interference in my radios has always failed whenever I try to take shortcuts. I’ve been able to find nearly every instance of interference by starting with turning off the power in the house and adding circuits one by one until the interference appears. That always narrows down the search significantly. The one advantage you have in the airplane is that because you’re moving over a wide range of locations you can eliminate external sources right away. Sometimes I’ve had to go to a neighbor and find out if they’re doing anything different. If this process of elimination doesn’t yield any results, there may be a new fault, possibly a loose or corroded ground, and that could be either in the engine compartment or anywhere else in the aircraft. One of the best tricks I have for localizing source is taking a small battery powered radio set to an empty AM frequency and moving it around the cockpit and engine area to find the max volume of the static. Good luck tracking this down. There’s really a lot of additional things you can do, and I’m only suggesting some hints to get you started. The most important thing is that you turn into a detective. It’s really a Sherlock Holmes event, and as a good detective says, after you’ve eliminated all the logical possibilities that which is the left has to be the cause no matter how improbable. if you get stuck we can chat by phone and figure out next steps. Ed
  18. Gfeldman

    com radio static

    Hi Phoenix owners, Today while flying my plane I was experienced loud static on my com radio that didn't go away when I changed frequencies. Eric I know a few years back you encountered this. How did you trouble shoot and did you ever find a cause? I will remove the seat to trace the PTT wires integrity. I think you said that Jim separated some wires in the panel. Can you give me a few more details. I have in the past heard interference when I had my strobes on that abated when I turned them off. I also used my handheld transceiver and could detect no static so I think it originates inside the plane. George N33GF
  19. wanted to buy. a completed rudder to fit "A" model Sonex Xenos I have no place or tools to rebuild some minor damage on the one I have on my Xenos. Please contact me at email address: ldsjohnsong@hotmail.com
  20. Gfeldman

    static rpm drop

    Eric thanks for this tip. After my last post I flew the Phoenix around our pattern 1x and found that on the takeoff roll I was getting 5050rpm substantially higher than the 47-4800 I got on static run up. No discernible vibration at or below 3000 today when I flew 45 miles to my A&p for its annual. I will have him sync carbs and ck them. George
  21. Eric Greenwell

    static rpm drop

    Was the engine running smoothly at the reduced RPM? I've have the RPM drop 500 rpm a few times, but there was always extra vibration. Could it be the RPM is correct but is being indicated incorrectly? Try asking on the Rotax Owners group, too: https://www.rotax-owner.com/en/forum
  22. 2013 Pipistrel Sinus Flex was involved in a landing accident. Many good parts remain. Both wings with flaperons are available. One has very minor damage near the tip, the other has an area about 8 inches by 16 inches near the leading edge just inboard of the spoiler. Both flaperons are perfect. Spoilers are perfect. Wings each have 13 gallon fuel tank. There are no short wing tips, and only one long tip which includes the strobe and navigation light. Complete set of upholstery, most of the control system. Seat belts complete, Instrument panel is empty. Both doors, one needs new plexiglass. No landing gear parts. The fuselage pod could be made into a simulator of some kind. There is no firewall forward.
  23. HiFlite

    Accessing Back Side of Instrument Panel - Tips?

    Lowest screw on each side holds the instrument panel on, but must be loosened; remove the next two higher ones on each side, and it slips out. Thanks!
  24. Steve Wieland

    • Steve Wieland
    •   
    • billb

  25. Steve Wieland

    • Steve Wieland
    •   
    • billb

  26. LIKE NEW!! Pipistrel Virus SW asking $114,500 144 hrs TTA&E NDH Dynon 180, Garmin 496, Baggage compartment, Ballistic Parachute After Factory Mods - Exterior lights, Landing Light Cruise 142 kts on 5 GPH!!
  27. LIKE NEW!! Pipistrel Virus SW asking $114,500 144 hrs TTA&E NDH Dynon 180, Garmin 496, Baggage compartment, Ballistic Parachute After Factory Mods - Exterior lights, Landing Light Cruise 142 kts on 5 GPH!!
  28. Steve Wieland

    Steve Wieland

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