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  3. sheridan9sc

    Ballistic Parachute Repacking

    Mike, The invoice breaks down the shipping as: Shipping of Canopy to Stratos for Inspection and Repack $146.90 Return Shipping Charges, from Factory to Customer $261.15 I don't know if the number of parachutes at one time would affect that cost.
  4. Earlier
  5. mikeschumann

    Ballistic Parachute Repacking

    Why was the shipping $400? I thought going thru the US dealer was going to get the shipping costs down. USPS shipping one way to the Czech Republic is ~$100.
  6. sheridan9sc

    Ballistic Parachute Repacking

    Here is the follow-up to my previous post. Parachute was returned to me on December 17, so about six weeks from shipment. Cost was $395 for the repack and $400 for the shipping to and from Czechoslovakia and back to me. Total cost, $860. I never got Dennis' photo listed in the instructions, but essentially you are only sending the softpack with the parachute itself. While Dennis needs the pictures of the cable in your plane in full resolution, I will attach reduced resolution shots here. All pictures in series 1 are taken inside the plane from various uncomfortable positions. Picture 1a is taken in selfie mode because it is behind the black, carbon fiber box you see in the top left of 1b (you will need an extra light source to illuminate the connection with the rocket). Picture 1d is under the instrument panel. Picture 4 is view from the top of the airplane looking down into the end of the rocket. Don't know if he needed all of the pictures in series 1, but these views were sufficient for him. All in all, the most difficult part is getting the parachute in and out of the plane!
  7. Good reminder - it's been at least three years since I've changed the tape on mine. Next time I'm at the hangar, I'll warm up a tape end on the wing root, then lift enough off the surface to see how much residue is left. I've always (30+ years) used 3M General Purpose Adhesive Cleaner #08984 to remove tape residue (and more, not just on gliders).
  8. In cool conditions (anything other than Florida or Arizona in the summer), use a heat gun first, and bring the temperature of the wing to about 80 f degrees. Then peel the tape sideways at a 45 degree angle. From Cumulus Soaring: Important Safety Note: "Gap Seal Tape" is Not Designed for Use on Control Surfaces This stretchy plastic tape is perfect for use sealing fixed gaps - such as the gap between the wing and fuselage. I do not recommend using it on control surfaces such as the gap between the wing and aileron or the fin and rudder, or the horizontal stabilizer and elevator. Plastic tape will shrink over time and especially when it gets hot in the sun. If it is connected to a control surface it may contract over time and not allow full travel of the control surface. Or as it gets tight it may pull off as it is stretched by the control surface - which could lead to high drag or reduced control of the aircraft as the tape flaps in the airstream or changes the airflow over the control surface. Using plastic tape secured on both sides and across a control surface gap is unsafe and may be an illegal modification to the aircraft. Notes on Cleaning Tape Residue
  9. Since it's in a hangar, I've had the same wing root tape on the Phoenix since its last annual a year ago. It's some of the high quality tape offered on Wings and Wheels. I had to remove it today to track down a leak, and to my surprise it was almost impossible to get off. Apparently the adhesive had dried out and formed a more steadfast bond with the gelcoat. I had to gently use a small plastic scraper to slowly get the vinyl tape off and then use some GooGone to soak and remove the yellowed, hardened adhesive. After wiping with a dry cloth I removed the final residue with some acetone. It took about an hour just to do one root. My guess about how this happened is that the tape adhesive gradually dries out over time. It probably didn't help that I had the plane in hot conditions in Ephrata last summer where it sat out with its covers in 90+ degree heat for several days. The W&W tape has a good reputation, but most sailplane owners are using it for shorter periods of time since it is removed at disassembly. I'm going to change it out more often. Additionally, in case this happens to anyone else... What got me started on this was that I found a small puddle (maybe 2 teaspoons) of oil under the bottom of the plane this morning. The drip point was the centerline of the fuselage about 9 inches in front of the trailing edge of the wing. There is nothing there that should be dripping except it is the low point of the belly at rest. What was weird was that there was a faint residue of oil from that drip point back to the trailing edge of the left wing root tape on the underside of the wing. Several very smart people spent an hour looking at this and trying to figure out what was happening until we realized the mechanism. I'm sure you're all familiar with the oil system breather tube that vents to a small slot just in the fuselage centerline just ahead of the landing gear. I've been practicing a lot of no spoiler landings in the pattern, and there is a very slight residue from the breather hole to the midpoint of the wing root underside. Some oil from the breather tube got under the wing root tape edge in the angled flow of the slips and then gradually tunneled back in the tape to the trailing edge where it slowly dripped out after I left, working its way by gravity to the fuselage centerline where it accumulated until a drop could form and create the tiny puddle. Very subtle. What was puzzling was, although we all thought it was oil, there was no direct residue path from the breather slot down the centerline to the drip point. Apparently the slips created the ideal conditions for this anomalous pathway. The tape from the underside midpoint of the wing all the way back was still adherent, but when I pulled on it the tape came off easily and was clearly soaked with oil.
  10. Jim Lee

    Oil Temp

    Hey Discus 239, that you Bill? What you describe is common. What Mike said about the cowl flap position is correct. What happens is the cowl flap cable slips in the clamp. It is attached to the radiator cowl with a clamp. When the cable housing slips in the clamp, the cowl flap setting changes. Yours now allows the cowl flap to go beyond open to a partly closed position. If you take a careful look at the cowl flap in full open position (I know that you already did, but imagine the tail sitting 2 feet high in the flight position) and imagine the air flowing straight into the inlet, you will notice that the partly closed cowl flap will now disrupt the airflow, decreasing cooling. Pull the cowl flap out one notch and see if the angle looks better. It doesn't take much of an angle to make a big difference in oil temp during the climb. Two easy fixes. Number one, pull the cowl flap knob out one notch and look at the cowl flap position. If it s now in the full open position, then this is your new open position of the knob. Number two, measure how much cable movement it takes to put the cowl flap in the open position. Remove the lower cowling, and move the cable housing this amount in the clamp. Your open setting will now be correct.
  11. MFPrice

    LX Nav Vario

    I use an S80 in my G109, programmed the variables a couple of years ago by looking at the Polar in the manual and figuring out the mathmatical translation but you solved it by just asking LXNav which works even better (no math required). Sorry I did not see your post last year. Overall I am satisfied with the S80 except that I bought the optional Artificial Horizon feature that they were unable to get working because of the engine vibrations which interfered with their hardware/software combination and Paul Remde at Cumulus refused to credit me even after LXNav admitted they were unable to make it work. Paul wanted me to uninstall the instrument, ship it at my expense to him for deprogramming, ship it at my expense back to me, then incur the cost of installation again which together would have cost more than what I paid for the instrument (another example of what Opioids are doing to America, definitely cannot recommend him).
  12. Eric Greenwell

    Oil Temp

    I hope I remember to try partially closing the flap the next time I make a long climb. Could be 4 months before the weather is hot enough to be a problem, and I might forget by then 😉
  13. MFPrice

    G109 Prop and Pushrod question.

    Two quick G109 questions. 1. My prop is approaching the TBO. I am in compliance with the latest AD. I am aware that for non-commercial operators the manufacturer's recommended TBO is just a recommendation (see ** note below) but just curious on what everyone else does. Do others send in their Hoffmann prop every TBO 72 months for a complete overhaul, or if their A&P inspects the prop and hub and checks for AD compliance and signs the annual that is satisfactory unless the pilot sees any warning indicators? 2. On a recent oil change I noticed that my pushrod tubes are leaking a little oil. Have any others used gasket sealants or compressible Porsche 914 pushrod tubes to seal things tight and then replace them with Limbach-sourced solid-style tubes on the next AD or convenient opportunity what are your thoughts/recommendations? ** For Part 91 operators (non-commercial operators), manufacturer recommended TBO intervals are not mandatory unless there is a TBO AD for that particular engine/airframe/prop and serial number range. Some pilots prefer it since a well cared-for engine/airframe/prop near TBO is far less likely to fail than one that has just been taken apart as part of an fresh overhaul. When buying an aircraft the TBO is more important since the care of the engine/airframe/prop is hard for the average buyer to ascertain.
  14. brasov

    brasov comb ridge.png

  15. Scott Renne

    LX Nav Vario

    For anyone flying a Pipistrel Sinus Max (long wing) with an LXNav S80, I have finally obtained the a, b, c variables necessary to enter this aircraft’s polar into the S80. There are lots of polars in the S80 as it comes from the factory, but not for the Sinus. LXNav tells me future releases of the software will contain the Sinus polar. Without the correct profile the unit will not be able to compute Speed-to-Fly and Netto functions properly. The values for these variables are: a: 2,2 b:-3,7 😄2,85 I obtained these by sending the polar data provided to me by Pipistrel (which I earlier posted elsewhere on this site) to LXNav in Slovenia and having them compute the values. I recommend that anyone using the values I am posting here to get the LXNav software update when it becomes available as the numbers could change as LXNav works with Pipistrel to verify that the polar used for the generating the numbers I provide here is the data that Pipistrel approves.
  16. mikeschumann

    Oil Temp

    What is the outside air temp and your airspeed when you run into this? Jim Lee suggested that when you start running hot, you increase your airspeed, which obviously will increase the airflow thru the oil cooler.
  17. discus239

    Oil Temp

    Thanks Mike, when fully open it is correctly perpendicular, it runs cooler when partially (like 20 degrees) closed. Temp only climbs after a long 4-5000ft. + climb so doesn't occur often, I lube the exposed end of the cable and so far always smooth, will perform further analysis.
  18. mikeschumann

    Oil Temp

    My oil temp is consistently a LOT lower than that. It sounds like your cowl flap is not open all the way. When it is full open, it should be perpendicular to the cowl opening, totally parallel to the air flow. The cable may need to be adjusted if this is not the case. NOTE: The cowl cable needs to be well lubricated periodically or it can be difficult, if not impossible to open the flap after it has been closed. I use a cable lube tool that you can buy at motorcycle shops, which clamps over the end of the cable and lets you force WD-40 into the cable. It's a messy affair and takes a significant amount of lube before it comes out by the control knob in the cockpit (make sure you have a rag properly positioned or you will make a big mess).
  19. discus239

    Oil Temp

    Sometimes during a long climb in hot weather oil temp will creep into the 220"s, then I will level off, reduce power and let it come back down. I was wondering what relative wind the intake was seeing, so the other day temp reached 223-224, I pulled the cowl flap knob out about half an inch. Temp immediately responded, and in a minute or two went down to 213, no other changes made. Weird, looking at the angle of the door on the ground it is tilted toward closed quite a bit. Can't explain it, maybe someone else can .
  20. Terry and I are set up to attend the Rainbow Aviation LSA Repair/Maint. course in April/May 2019 with the glider add-on. All things being equal we are planning to fly our Phoenix from its winter base in Atlanta to the Corning, CA course site. Would appreciate flight route experience of others as we go about our own flight planning. Thanks, Dave
  21. Todd

    South Central Florida Rendezvous?

    I’m Underh2oguy on the Pipistrel forum.
  22. provoshane

    Osh-Kosh 2018

    Planning on flying my Pipistrel Virus SW and parking it at the North 40. I will be renting a 5th wheel and staying at Sleepy Hollow Campground.
  23. provoshane

    South Central Florida Rendezvous?

    Great to see another Pipistrel pilot on here. If you haven't done so, please join us at http://forum.pipistrelowners.com We have about 350 Pipistrel owners and pilots in our forum and are always happy to see someone else join our group. Shane
  24. Todd

    South Central Florida Rendezvous?

    Great to hear that more gliders are on the way! Keep us informed of your progress.
  25. racaldwell

    South Central Florida Rendezvous?

    Todd, I am a ways away from finishing but there are two Xenos motorgliders being built at the Melbourne airport north side hangars. Mine is more than a yr. away from completion but Larry's is getting close. He started his engine for the 1st time this weekend.
  26. Perry

    Monett Moni #8

    Own one of the first Monis ever made, Moni #8! Brought to Portland this fall after being stored at a hangar in Idaho for 25 years. Seat is out and landing gear is off as previous owner was going to change undercarriage. Prop is a piece of art! Have original owner's manual. The finished Moni was a mildly aerobatic motoglider, surely one of the most fun and economical types of airplanes. A Moni pilot could zip along at 193 kph (120 mph) or stop her engine and glide around in search of thermal updrafts at a respectable 20:1 glide ratio. Airframe weight totalled about 118 kg (260 lb), a mere 1.8 kg (4 lb) over the legal weight limit for ultralights but the Moni was at least two times faster. All this superb performance depended on a small and economical power plant, the KFM 107 two-stroke, air-cooled engine that Monnett included with all the kits he sold.
  27. Todd

    South Central Florida Rendezvous?

    Thanks Mike, You gave me a great flight in your Phoenix last year. I ended up with the Pipistrel as the wait for a new one was only 6 months verses a few years for a new Phoenix. The Vero Beach operation is out of New Hibiscus (X52). I flew in there last spring but it was a week day and nothing going on. There were gliders in the hangar and it is a club operation. I will try to get up that way again on a nice weekend and hope to see some gliders in the air. I’ll also look into La Belle.
  28. mikeschumann

    South Central Florida Rendezvous?

    I fly a Phoenix Motorglider out of Naples. There was a pretty active informal glider operation at LaBelle last year until Tom Irlbeck’s unfortunate accident. I’m not sure what’s going on there this season. It also looks like there is a new glider operation near Vero Beach.
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