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  1. Yesterday
  2. Ron Friedhoff

    South Central Florida Rendezvous?

    Hi All, I own a Sundancer which presently resides in California. My goal is to enjoy it in South Florida this coming winter. Presently working on the logistics e.g. finding a suitable hanger near my home in Wellington, Fl. ( Any leads appreciated!!!) I do have a 28ft landscape trailer as my backup. Planning on attending the wave camp in Minden in April and possibly bringing my motor glider.
  3. Last week
  4. Eric Greenwell

    Electric Fuel Pump

    I check the fuel flow into the filter with the top cowling off, of course, but checking the pressure from the cockpit display like you do sounds like a good additional check. I don't know why I haven't been doing it every flight, instead of sporadically. I don't recall it taking more than 10 seconds to build up pressure, but I will measure it next time I fly.
  5. mikeschumann

    Electric Fuel Pump

    I'm in the cockpit when I check the fuel pump, so I have no idea what is going on in the filter. It sounds like a priming issue, or maybe a stuck check valve (or vapor lock). It's definitely not pumping or there would be pressure. I can't tell if it is pumping when I turn it on after the engine is running. Next time I land, I will leave the fuel pump on when I shut down the engine and see what happens with the fuel pressure.
  6. Eric Greenwell

    Electric Fuel Pump

    I rarely watch the pump pressure when testing the electric fuel pump; instead, I watch the fuel flow into the filter near the pump. If the plane has be unused for several days, a lot of fuel flows for a few seconds, then it diminishes to almost zero (I think it's filling the carb bowl, then some is fed from the carbs back to the left tank). As long as the timing and fuel flows seem normal, I'm happy. I do occasionally check the fuel pressure widget on the Skyview. I'm not suggesting this better than checking the fuel pressure, but does give you different information. So, does your pump put fuel through filter, suggestig the pump is just not producing as much pressure as before? Or is it not putting out any fuel at all, suggesting pump might not have fuel on the inlet, or that the check valve is blocked?
  7. Eric Greenwell

    Oil Temp

    I think the air inlet on the muffler for the cabin heat is in the path of the air flowing through the cowl openings (the ones on each side of the prop shaft) and the oil/water radiators cooling scoop. Closing the cowl scoop reduces the amount heated air from the oil/water radiators, and so less heat gets to the cabin.
  8. mikeschumann

    Electric Fuel Pump

    As part of the standard engine start checklist, I test the electric fuel pump..Not only due I listen to see if it is running, but I also wait to see the fuel pressure rise, which used to take about 20-30 seconds. Recently it has taken much longer for the fuel pump to prime. During the last couple of flights I gave up waiting for the fuel pressure to come up and just started the engine without the electric pump on. The engine started normally. Does anyone have any ideas on why the electric pump is not priming? Is this something I should be worried about?
  9. mikeschumann

    Oil Temp

    Why does closing the cowl flap affect the cabin heating?
  10. Andreas Clauss

    Oil Temp

    I have an issue when flying at low ambient temperature. With the aerodynamic efficiency of the plane, altitude restrictions and variable pitch prop, I fly typically at around 2.2 Gal/hour. Very often I keep the cowl fully close at the expense of cabin heating. When I spoke with the Rotax service, they recommended to install a thermostat in the oil circuit. Any experience with this in the US?
  11. Eric Greenwell

    TMGA active?

    Jamey, your anticipated usage would work fine with a Phoenix. As I mentioned before, most of my soaring in the Phoenix is with the engine idling because it lets me soar more and worry less about staying in gliding range of an airport. When I fly my self-launcher, I'm the opposite: I put the engine away as soon as I can, and most flights it's used only for the launch, as it's much better glide means I can easily (most of the time) stay within reach of an airport. It's design allows it to land safely in almost any farmer's field (unlike the Phoenix), so I sometimes risk that when the conditions are predictable enough.
  12. I know the original post is 4 years old, but I had this draft problem happen in a big way today. I was on a flight doing both power on and off, then when I was back on power and at 4000 ft when we got a lot of cold air coming into the cockpit from the pitch trim lever opening. It had pretty good velocity and scared me that something must be wrong. I landed immediately to check out the exterior. Found nothing. Took back off, had the draft for the first part of the climb, leveled off and it just suddenly went away. I don't understand it. If any Phoenix user has an understanding of this, I would appreciate info. It feels more like some gap seal is opening at random.
  13. Earlier
  14. airusa

    Soar the Colorado Rockies

    until
    Joe and Jimmy Kulbeth (brothers) are planning this summer a one month tour of the Colorado Rockies and do some great soaring. I have friends that live there and own Lambadas. They tell me unbelievable tales about high altitude soaring and unbelievable scenery. I have not experienced that kind of soaring in a very long time. I want to do it again, my brother Jimmy has never had a taste of it and now wants to give it a try. We are open to having anyone to join us. If you are interested let us know and we all can be included in the planning. Our thoughts at the moment is fly to different airports like Gunnison, West Cliff, Long Mont, Greely, Meadow Lake (KFLY) and any other place we feel like. Take what ever we need in the baggage compartment, rent a car if we need one, and just simply nomad our way around the state. I flew across Colorado from Madera, CA to North Platte, NE to watch the eclipse last year. Crossing the Rocky Mountains from Salt Lake to North Platte was one of the best trips I have ever made in any vehicle. The SunDancer made a dream come true. Of course it doesn't need to be a SunDancer, any motor glider will work. Come on join in. Joe Kulbeth 559-960-7873 joekulbeth.airusa@gmail.com
  15. For anyone needing assistance with a Lambada or SunDancer, I may be a good place to start for information and repairs. I am factory trained on Woodcomp propellers, SunDancers, Lambada, Samba, and last and not least the Rotax engine. I have numerous spare parts on hand, or I can get them in short order. If you are in need do not hesitate to give me a call see if I can be of any help. Joe Kulbeth 559-960-7873 or email; joekulbeth.airusa@gmail.com Please understand if I do not answer your original call, because if you are not in my contact list and I can not recognize the caller I don't answer due to so many ROBO calls, so please leave a message I will call you back. Or just send me a text to that number. For the aircraft I have for sale just ask for the information if you are interested and I will email you the details. AIRUSA Fresno, CA 93723
  16. jbradmd

    TMGA active?

    Jamey; It appears that you have a very thoughtful and thorough approach to the purchase of a TMG. I just want to wish you well in that endeavor regardless of your choice. I am very partial to the Stemme, but you and others have well outlined the pros and cons of the Stemme and various other aircraft. I'm certain that you will pic the right aircraft for you. I just hope we can meet someday at a TMG function like Parowan or an SSA convention. Soaring is a fantastic sport regardless if you are in an 1-26 or a Stemme. And glider pilots seem to be an exceptional group of men and women. Cheers (as my friend and mentor Glider Bob used to say) Jim
  17. Jamey Jacobs

    TMGA active?

    Eric (et al) My flying will be based from the east SF Bay area, so it will be a mix of local foothills (Williams, Livermore, Hollister...)as well as touring the western states on mini-safaris. I also want to use it for local power flying to beautiful destinations like Monterey/Carmel, Napa Valley and Tahoe. So, I would have to be careful on the safaris to airport hop or use the motor to maintain altitude in the more desolate areas in a Phoenix. I think occasional power use is fine to extend the soaring experience with safety as a high priority vs soaring purity. The Phoenix seems to be good enough to run the eastern Sierra and Whites (Owens valley) because of the local airport population, but I haven’t done my homework on acceptable min altitudes. A Stemme would make it a completely different experience, but at a significant expense, especially if I only do the safaris or Sierra runs a few times a year. I’d appreciate a reality check from you or others with this kind of experience. There’s a lot more info from the Stemme group on longer western flying (maybe for good reason), but it seems reasonable in a Phoenix with occasional, thoughtful use of the motor. Jamey
  18. Eric Greenwell

    TMGA active?

    Jamey, where do you expect to do most of your soaring? The value of high performance (high glide ratio and cruise speeds) is greater in rugged, unpopulated areas like Nevada than in flatter farming areas like Kansas, which has many more closely spaced airports and safe fields than Nevada. The elfin looked very interesting, but I didn't see any pricing for it. I'm guessing it will be at least $300K delivered to your door, with instruments and oxygen, but without the range extender or a trailer. The extender is priced at $48,000 euro, which seems like a lot for something that isn't an aircraft engine, but it does make touring possible. But, until a glider has flown and begins serial production, prices and delivery dates are usually uncertain, and early purchasers are inevitably part of the final testing team. I'd expect there to be a lot less problems than when the S10 debuted, but anything this complicated has teething risks.
  19. Jamey Jacobs

    TMGA active?

    Jim The Stemme S10/12 is clearly the best performing TMG and a fantastic soaring machine! I believe that in order to attain that spectacular performance it is a a bit more complex than other TMGs like the Phoenix. As you mentioned, the Stemme owners seem to be a great group who are more socially and technically interactive than most - very desirable and valuable camaraderie! I’m glad you spoke up for the Stemme, and I agree it is nearly ideal in many ways. I’m not a high performance sailplane guy, most of my flying is in sailplanes (and a Carat) with less than 40:1, and hang gliders - I don’t know what I’m missing. So, cost and complexity are the challenge which make me consider other TMGs like the Phoenix, but of course those will never match the Stemme’s performance! “Horses for courses” as they say... Someday I will likely move up to the Stemme. Nice to have the discussion Jamey
  20. jbradmd

    TMGA active?

    Well it looks like someone needs to stick up for the Stemme S10-VT. I have owned mine for several years and keep it at Deer Valley, Phoenix in the winter and Flagstaff in the summer. I love the 50:1 glide ratio, and the 914 engine has caused few problems while outperforming a Cessna 172. I have flown with less than 15 minutes on the engine from Flagstaff to Montrose, from Flagstaff to Moriarty, and Montrose back to Flagstaff, and multiple trips back and forth from Phoenix to Flagstaff. I have also flown it several times to California and the Minden Wave Camp once last year. I have no problems working with Phoenix approach and Deer Valley tower getting in and out of Class B and D airspace, and I never land with the engine on. It has comfortable side by side side seating, and putting the wings on and off is really not that difficult. One of the best things about owning a Stemme is the very close knit group of the Stemme Owners Group (SOG) who meet a different times of the year for flying and camaraderie. Yes it is expensive to own and maintain, and I think the S12 will further drop the prices of the S10's which may make ownership more affordable. At least try a test flight in a Stemme if you are planning to purchase a TMG. Jim Bradburn
  21. algee1_73@yahoo.com

    TMGA active?

    Hi Jamey, My Phoenix is #24, and like Eric, I flew it (though solo) from Florida to Washington State. It's kept South of Seattle. During soaring season I'll motor across the Cascades, turn off the engine, and spend as much time soaring as the lift/ my bladder will allow. Then turn the engine back on and let it warm up as I glide towards a local runway. Will repeat the process except after soaring, will motor back across the Cascade Mountains to home base. You asked about flying without the wing extensions, which is what I typically do all Winter, to keep the engine lubricated and my currency up. It is more roll-responsive, which is to be expected, and flies quite well. There's only a 5 knot recommended increase in pattern speeds, and the take-off performance is so good that it would be hard to notice anything lacking there. Overall I feel the airplane is a good medium-performance glider, which is reliably responsive and comfortable enough to sit in for a few hours. But you need to know that it can be very tricky to land. Nothing that can't be mastered, but it's not for the sloppy traffic pattern/approach pilot. And you either have to be comfortable managing cross-winds, or be somewhere where a runway is usually reasonably close to the wind, if it's more than 8 or so knots. None of this is a serious issue for the airplane, but needs to be known. If you want to chat about my experiences, feel free to call. 206-910-9173. Alan Gurevich
  22. Jamey Jacobs

    TMGA active?

    Tim Thanks for the message and info on the Elfin. It is a truly wonderful concept which virtually eliminates the trade offs of the current TMGs. I’m quite interested and would love to talk with you more about it! I assume it is in the same price range (with the range extender) as a new S12. Or, is that a bad assumption? Thanks again Jamey
  23. Tim Blofeld

    TMGA active?

    Hi Jamey, Thought I would jump in as I was in the same position as you. Loved the idea of a Stemme but maintenance expense was a killer, and too heavy in roll for me. Phoenix was next best option but I found the cockpit too tight and was looking for a better L/D. My solution is Reiner Stemme's new aircraft the RS20e Elfin. It's like a second generation S10, with 10 feet less wingspan, a ballistic recovery parachute, electric power (smoother, quieter, cheaper and more reliable). 50:1 L/D plus several other improvements and it fits in my hangar better! I ordered one last year and it should be here (NorCal) this October. Will be first in the US. Here's the website; http://www.reinerstemme.aero/product/#rs10e. I have been to the Berlin factory and met Dr. Stemme a couple of times so I am currently the de facto US expert if you want to know more! Cheers Tim
  24. Eric Greenwell

    TMGA active?

    The trip home from FL to WA was a real adventure, and I'm glad Russ Owens was with me, as he has far more experience with airplanes than I do. I fly with the short tips when it's windy (it's less sensitive to gusts and cross winds), when I don't expect any soaring (I'm lazy - then I don't have to take the tips off to put it back in the hangar), if I'm going to places where taxiing is awkward (lights, closely spaced hangars, and these days, huge piles of snow on our ramps). The handling doesn't feel much different, except for one thing: the spoilers are significantly more effective (shorter wing, same size spoilers), and that makes it easier to land; also, it floats less with short tips, so also easier. While a 40:1 Phoenix would be a big step up in performance, 30:1 is quite adequate in areas like eastern Washington State, where I fly the Phoenix the most, with large flat areas, rolling hills, and ringed with mountains. The lift is widespread, cloudbases are 7-8000 AGL, and you can get around pretty well. It's a better than a Blanik in cross-country performance, maybe like a Ka-6, except in weak conditions.
  25. Jamey Jacobs

    TMGA active?

    Thanks Eric. I’m pretty familiar with Stemme’s and there’s even more complexity than you mention (prop, gear, cooling, S12 wing fold, even getting in and out...). Interestingly, a pilot who has owned both Stemme and Phoenix says the Stemme is not well harmonized, especially at higher airspeeds with very sensitive pitch and heavy roll, and the Phoenix is exceptionally well harmonized and as sweet to fly as anything he’s flown (which is a lot). This nice handling Phoenix opinion seems widespread and encouraging. But, I sure would like a 40+:1 Phoenix though — life is full of trade offs! Just finished your blog about getting your Phoenix home. Very enjoyable and entertaining. By the way - do you and others fly with the short wingtips much? Seems like that might be noticeably different and handle more like a nimble sports car. I plan to fly with Jim Lee when he returns from the Senior nationals in Florida.
  26. Eric Greenwell

    TMGA active?

    The Phoenix has a standard, front mounted mounted Rotax 912 that is easily accessed by removing the top and bottom cowls in less than 5 minutes. The Stemmes have a mid-bay mounted 914 driving a long shaft to the folding, variable pitch prop, so it's a much more complex, difficult and expensive to work on, plus it does need more attention. It's soaring and power performance exceeds the Phoenix, but for my purposes, the Phoenix has enough of each, and is a lot easier to live with. Smaller, lighter, easier is more appealing to me at this stage in my life, than lots bigger, much heavier, and more difficult.
  27. dktudor

    Grob 109 Parting out

    I am parting out a Grob 109, ( engine and prop sold )many controls, and structural parts that are no longer supported by Grob. Seats in very good condition. Would prefer to sell all as a package. Aircraft damaged beyond repair, no wings, fuselage aft of fuel tank bulkhead in repairable condition. Might trade parts for flying time with your instructor world wide . This amount of parts is a rare. I can send photos of specific assemblies if required. I will be posting a video of the control parts that are undamaged. Both spoilers ok . Most instruments undamaged, Kx155 undergoing testing to certify. Narco transponder with altitude coding. Buyer pays shipping and California sales tax. Dave Tudor 415 563-4803 . San Francisco CA
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